Sunday, October 17, 2010

Sphalerite


This Sphalerite, more than any of my other specimens I think, benefits immensely from being lit well and magnified. It has so much detail and crazy iridescence that is difficult to see with the naked eye because it is so tiny and dark. Under the greasy iridescent metallic coating it is actually a dark transparent rusty red stone. Without the light hitting it in the right way, it just looks black. I think it's going to be fun (and a big challenge) to paint.

On a side note, it is so hard to take photos in my house in the evening. It is just too dark, and I lack the skills to compensate for the lack of light. I apologize for the badly lit blurry photos which will likely become the norm here, now that it's getting dark earlier and earlier.

*edit - In case you can't tell in the photos, the colourful image is just the photo I took and printed out as reference and the painting has only been sketched out so far. When I took these photos I hadn't actually started painting.

12 comments:

  1. I've recently found your work and am fascinated. Crystal and rock jewelry everywhere now, but amazing paintings like these? LOVE your versions.

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  2. Wow! I am speechless.I absolutely LOVE your paintings. So gorgeous, this one especially.

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  3. It's funny that you say that about your pictures because I've always loved your indoor, nighttime photos. They're so warm and lovely! And oh WOW that painting.

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  4. I'm such a big fan of your work Carly! I'm not much of an artist myself but I'm an avid rock collector and wanted to try and paint one of my favorite rocks too! I've been trying to paint just using a tiny speciment and you're right....it's HARD! Could you tell me what kind of camera and program you use to magnify it? Thanks!

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  5. Hi Julianna,

    Thanks! I use a macro lens on a DSLR (a Sigma 50mm f2.8 on a Nikon D60 body). I'm sure there are many other options that would work, but the key is a macro lens that can focus close on a small object. Even a point and shoot with a macro setting may work. The other important thing is lighting - you'll need to use multiple lights and possibly mirrors to get the light to reflect exactly how you want. The more facets, the more finicky it is to set up. I do some background clean-up and maybe a little colour/exposure correction in photoshop if necessary, then print it out and go from there. Hope that helps!

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  6. Your photograph is so beautiful, the drawing is already looking lovely, I look forward to seeing the painting, I really love your work.

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  7. this will be amazing... with all those colors... have a nice time working on it.
    xo
    agnes

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  8. These are amazing paintings. when I first saw your web page I thought they were real gemstones, I love your work very much!

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  9. Was just about to ask you about your lens, but Julianna beat me to it! I'm crazy about your work by the way, and love knowing that your wee studio it a abuzz with commissions and prep for a big show!

    cheers from India! xo.

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  10. Thanks you guys! You are all so sweet!

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